Jiang Recognized as University Distinguished Professor
 

Six top faculty members have been selected as university distinguished professors in recognition of their outstanding contributions to teaching, research and service in science and the humanities. They also have made major contributions to their professions and communities.  Each recipient will receive a $10,000 salary supplement.

Provost James R. Coffman said the newly named university distinguished professors were honored at fall 2004 commencement ceremonies in December.  Among the recipients was Honxging Jiang.  Jiang leads the K-State Semiconductor Research Group in the department of physics.  His laboratory is regarded as one of the best for wide bandgap semiconductor material epitaxial growth and micro- and nano-fabrication of photonic and electronic devices.  His group has pioneered the fabrication of micro- and nano-photonic structures and devices based on III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, which emit ultraviolet, blue and green light.

Jiang's research group at K-State has long been a leader in basic research on wide bandgap semiconductors and the application of this research to the development of light emitting and other electronic devices.  In the past few years the group's efforts have continued to receive international acclaim.  At present, the group can create materials that provide light emitting sources well into the ultraviolet region.  These materials are likely to become parts of solutions of a wide variety of problems ranging from improved efficient lighting for energy savings, detection of biological agents, to optical communications.  Jiang has brought more than $12 million in grant funds to K-State.  He holds several patents, with others pending, and is the author of books, book chapters, and more than 200 articles in professional journals.

A K-State faculty member since 1988, he was a visiting scientist at Sandia National Lab in 1999.  He earned his bachelor's degree at Fudan University in China, his master's and his doctorate at Syracuse (N.Y.) University.