ball1.gif Python V

Coble et al. use Q band (centered on 40 GHz) data from the ground-based Python V experiment at the South Pole to constrain CMBR anisotropy.

The window functions were provided by K. Coble. The first column in the window function file is $\ell$, which runs from 2 to 350. The next eight columns are the Python V zero-lag $W_\ell$'s for modulations 1 to 8.


Table: Python V zero-lag Window Function Parameters
Modulation $\ell_{e^{-0.5}}$ $\ell_{\rm e}$ $\ell_{\rm m}$ $\ell_{e^{-0.5}}$ $\sqrt{I(W_\ell)}$
1 28 49.6 42 60 1.24
2 48 73.5 71 100 1.05
3 81 108.4 104 131 0.669
4 113 140.5 135 161 0.445
5 145 171.7 166 192 0.297
6 176 202.7 198 223 0.195
7 208 233.5 230 253 0.125
8 239 264.0 260 284 0.0771

The quoted bandtemperature values are computed for a flat bandpower spectrum. They are from Coble et al., with ($+15$%, $-12$%) added in quadrature to the statistical 1 $\sigma$ error bars to account for the 1 $\sigma$ calibration uncertainty. Cross-modulation correlations have not been accounted for.

Fig.: Python V zero-lag window functions. (Postscript version here.) win_PythonV.gif

REFERENCES

ball23.gifLink to the experiment webpage.

K. Coble, et al., ``Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background at Degree Angular Scales: Python V Results", Astrophys. J. Lett. 519, L5 (1999).


Bharat Ratra and Tarun Souradeep
Department of Physics, Kansas State University
Last updated: 2000-08-31